WWI Final Day Saturday 2nd March

Open Public Meeting Saturday 2nd March 10.30-12.00

Come and find out more about what the project has achieved and how we plan to go on.  Hear from volunteers and others how the project inspired them in different ways and find out about the WWI Book group, the Knit and Natter group’s activities, creative writing from primary school pupils to university students, and other community-based activities.

This event is FREE.

Tea/coffee will be served from 10.00.  To help with catering requirements, please book through the Events page on the museum’s website or at Reception.

Talks on the aftermath of the war Saturday 2nd March 1.30-3.30

Join us for three fascinating talks on the aftermath of the war:

  • The Paris Peace Conference with Professor Charlotte Alston (Northumbria University)
  • Campaigning to transform international life with Dr. Daniel Laqua (Northumbria University)
  • The birth of the German Republic 1918-1919 with Dr. André Kiel (Liverpool John Moores University)

As a whole the event will involve reflections on the legacies of war and its impact on building post-conflict societies, which should lead to some lively discussion.

This event is FREE.

Tea/coffee will be available during this event.  To help with catering requirements, please book through the Events page on the museum’s website or at Reception.

WWI Embroidery Day Friday 1st March

WWI Embroidery Day Friday 1st March

10.30-1.00

Join Pat Ashton-Smith, a textile artist and member of the Embroiderers’ guild with over twenty years of experience in using traditional and new techniques for a free workshop.  Pat will help participants to create a 3D poppy using raised embroidery techniques.  Pat says: ‘During the workshop you will be shown three ways to create wired flower petals and you can choose the one you prefer to work your own poppy.  Once completed this can be made into a brooch or mounted in a card or frame.  A materials pack will be provided but please bring along a small pair of scissors.’

Numbers are limited.  Please book through the Events page on the museum website or at Reception.

2.30-3.30

Pat will give a free illustrated talk on WWI embroidered postcards – “Love Letters from the Front” – followed by an opportunity to ask questions and see embroidered postcards from her extensive collection.

And remember – our project exhibition is still on, so you could visit (or re-visit) that as well.  There are several embroidered postcards included in the exhibition as well as other embroidered items.

12.00-4.00

Enjoy a pop-up display of WWI items on loan from the Embroiderers’ Guild’s prestigious exhibition ‘Calm During the Storm’.  These are in addition to material currently on display in the project exhibition.  Embroidery was often used as a therapy for convalescent servicemen and, after the war ended, several projects used embroidery as a means of providing employment for disabled servicemen.  Embroidery, especially embroidered postcards for servicemen to send home, also provided an opportunity for French and Belgian women to earn an income.

Free with admission, to annual pass-holders and to Friends

WWI Food drop-in event Monday 25th February

WWI Food drop-in event

How about sampling some of the food that was on offer during the war?  Join food historians Jan and Richard Crouch on Monday 25th February between 11.00 and 3.30 to find out more about food during the war and food cooked to WWI recipes.

Food was rationed during the war, so being on the Home Front often meant finding how to make new dishes from the limited foodstuffs available.  And some of the recipes are very ingenious!

When the peace treaties were signed in 1919, there were celebrations throughout the land including Teesdale.  We know there were Peace processions in several villages and many street parties.  Jan and Richard will recreate a 1919 Peace street party.

Richard will give a short illustrated talk about food during the war at 11.30 and 2.30 but you can drop in at any time to talk to them, see their displays and sample some of the food people cooked a hundred years ago.

And remember – our project exhibition is still on, so you could visit (or re-visit) that as well.

Free with admission, to annual pass-holders and Friends